The Illusion of Free Stuff

We are taught in basic economics that goods have intrinsic value (i.e. cost of production + some margin of profit), and that they have perceived value (i.e. what the market will bear), with perceived value determining how wide that margin of profit can be.
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David Newhoff’s Open Response to Peter Sunde

The aspect of your recent statement that I find most striking is that one of your core complaints about the Internet we have today—the money-for-nothing Internet—is actually aligned with many of the same criticisms that I and my copyright-supporting colleagues have of the business models that tend to dominate Silicon Valley enterprises. But the thing you clearly don’t get, Peter, is that this is the Internet you helped create.

Read full article on The Illusion of More

David Newhoff’s Open Response to Peter Sunde

The aspect of your recent statement that I find most striking is that one of your core complaints about the Internet we have today—the money-for-nothing Internet—is actually aligned with many of the same criticisms that I and my copyright-supporting colleagues have of the business models that tend to dominate Silicon Valley enterprises. But the thing you clearly don’t get, Peter, is that this is the Internet you helped create.

Read full article on The Illusion of More

The Illusion of Free Stuff

We are taught in basic economics that goods have intrinsic value (i.e. cost of production + some margin of profit), and that they have perceived value (i.e. what the market will bear), with perceived value determining how wide that margin of profit can be.
Read full article on The Illusion of More